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Archive for the ‘Domes’ Category

This magnificent dome home in Baja Sur, Mexico has a dramatic view.

This magnificent dome home in Baja Sur, Mexico has a dramatic view.


Baja Sur dome home kitchen

Baja Sur dome home kitchen


Inspired by world-renowned American architect Nader Kahlili, these handmade art vaults [domes] are a typical example of the earth and ceramic architecture. Built with material free disposal of the land, the five domes technologies and innovations superadobe function currently available. Perched on a hill of El Gavilan – most dramatic settings in all of Great Northern Baja California Sur coast. Based on the designs of the environment, these vaults are among the Earth with solar energy and absolutely beautiful and out. Interiors feature soft curved walls, ceilings and many beautiful artistic touches. Each room has windows with views and doors opening onto a terrace overlooking the Pacific. Two comfortable rooms with beds and custom desktops, each with its own bathroom located on opposite wings of the main room. The buildings are energy efficient cool in summer and warm in winter, and probably the majority of households in the environment that never found. Two bedrooms with comfortable beds and desks custom, with STI Each bathroom situated on opposite wings off the main living area. Probably the most environmentally friendly homes you’ll ever come across.
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 2.0
Parking: 4
Land: 1499.92 m2
$499,000

Source: Casasy Terrenos.com

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Ramirez Bari V01

Ramirez Bari V01


Ramirez Bari V01 AL2

Ramirez Bari V01 AL2


Take some time and enjoy architect Jose Andres Vallejo’s stunning Photostream site and website.

Previous blog post about Jose Andres Vallejo’s house designs

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Bonita Domes by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)

Bonita Domes by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)


Earthbag vaults by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)

Earthbag vaults by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)


“I would like to announce the United Earth Builders 10 day intensive workshop beginning in April! Located in Joshua Tree we will be teaching attendees how to build a standard 8′ earthbag dome and a retaining wall.

Participants in this workshop will be led through a series of intellectual, cognitive, and physical exercises that seek to strengthen mind-body connections to both the technical processes, as well as the creative processes underlying the art and skill of earthbag design and construction. From structural principles and design, soil practicum and on-site planning this 10-day workshop will supply the attendee with full confidence in the building process and instill a renewed sense of community through building with the earth.

About
Our mission, duty and purpose is to provide educational and charitable services in regard to environmentally sustainable, affordable, and structurally sound sandbag homes with the intent to help relieve poverty by improving living conditions globally.

Mission
United Earth Builders mission, duty and purpose is to empower and instill confidence in people by providing educational and charitable services in regard to environmentally sustainable, artfully designed and truly organic homes that compliment Nature.

What guides us:
We seek to make a more positive world by turning up good music, playing with earth bag structures and teaching the techniques to anyone and everyone, smiling and laughing as we do it!

Rehabilitate ourselves through honest play and an ethical, moral and high spirited team of builders. The Golden Rule is our life and collaboration works for everyone.

What We Provide:
Experienced-based-learning – workshops that provide you will a wholesome curriculum and full hands-on building experience.
Collaborative community beautification projects; with local non-profits and community leaders; in order to provide a tool to combat community deterioration and help improve race and ethnic relations, lessening neighborhood tensions.
Fund raise in order to attain seismic shake table testing; a key factor for providing the public with a record of proof to show the International Code Council (ICC) that sandbag homes are a viable and safe option for global deployment.

Hands-on training
We provide local, national and global communities with the ability to design and build adequate housing using the most abundant resource on the planet.”

Source: United Earthbuilders on Facebook
United Earth Builders.com

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Hello, I am building a superadobe dome here in Brazil and was wandering if I could ask you for some advice about safety issues. It is one dome only building with internal diameter about 24.6 ft wide (7.5 m) and we are using 19.7 inches (50 cm) wide poly bags. The estimated height we´ll be achieving soon for the closure of the dome is about 23 ft (7 m). The earth material is a mixture of clay, cement and sand to avoid infiltration because of the high rainfall here. We are planning to make a light dome on top, which will make us finish the dome in a wide internal ring about 6.5 ft
wide (2 m).

My concern is about people´s safety working and moving heavy material in height. I tried to install some hooks with safety ropes and people are using harnesses to move along the wall. We are using movable scaffolding inside the dome to distribute material along the rows, but it is still not working well. I am not sure how to guarantee the safety of the people working during the closure. Another concern of mine is about the structural integrity of a dome this wide, does it need temporary or permanent. anchoring or reinforcement of any kind? Do you know how can I find technical information I could use in this case? See attached photos (not shown here).
Andre

Owen:
Hello Andre, Your project looks pretty good to me. Just be careful though since you’re at about the maximum size dome for earthbags. I would have added some rebar down through the bags as the walls went up. It’s cheap ‘insurance’. If the dome is not perfectly symmetrical, then problems can develop. Be sure to read the article about the Om Dome. They had to tear down the walls because the shape was off just a little, so be careful. If you feel or see anything strange, be prepared to jump to the outside immediately.

Machinery of some sort is the most efficient way to move lots of soil high up on a wall. The next best way is probably a chain gang of sorts, where workers pass 2-gallon buckets from one person to the next. It’s safer to keep all the workers on the outside until the earthbag work is finished. You could use ladders instead of scaffolding if not enough scaffolding is available, or both. And don’t rush things. It does get quite dangerous up on the wall. That’s one reason I like a loft, because it creates a nice work platform. Next time consider embedding lots of short poles between the bags to support planks to stand on. Cut them off when finished. Good luck and please keep us posted.

Kelly:
Hi Andre, I read Owen’s advice and agree with what he suggests. One factor in determining the stability of the building is how much the wall moves or vibrates when being walked on. If it is shaking very much, then I would be more concerned than if it felt rock solid. All of the larger domes that I have made have stabilizing supports or vigas going across at loft level, and this has rigidified the structure considerably. You might want to add something like this for this reason alone, if you feel unsure about the stability. These vigas can also provide a nice platform for further work above to finish the dome.

In studying you photos, I also have a concern about the way that the large arched opening was formed. I see that you still have the supports for it in place, and this might be a good thing. Even though you are using cement stabilized fill, that top bag runs many feet almost horizontally, with practically no arch to it. This concerns me because it is easy for me to visualize that collapsing at some point, after the form is removed. Usually with long superadobe arches people make sure that the bags also arch, especially directly over the top. You can see this in the pictures at http://earthbagbuilding.com/projects/sandbagshelters.htm You might want to provide further solid reinforcement, such as with a steel frame, to help support this area of the opening.

This looks like a fun project, and will certainly be one of the largest earthbag domes that I know about. Do keep us posted on how it turns out.

Owen:
A few more thoughts. Are you using one of the recommended methods for earthbag domes?
Kelly Hart’s method
Two string-lines method
– Catenary dome: explained by Doni and Kaki in their book Earthbag Building – The Tools, Tricks and Techniques

Also, I suggest inspecting the dome about twice a day to see if any gaps develop between courses of earthbags.

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An earthbag dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less plaster maintenance if it’s protected by a durable roof. (click to enlarge)

An earthbag dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less plaster maintenance if it’s protected by a durable roof. (click to enlarge)


Attach rafters to braces that are embedded between courses of earthbags. (click to enlarge)

Attach rafters to braces that are embedded between courses of earthbags. (click to enlarge)


Nailers help hold braces in position. (click to enlarge)

Nailers help hold braces in position. (click to enlarge)


As discussed in a previous blog post the other day (see link below), dome roofs protect domes from moisture damage, shade the structure, reduce plaster work and capture rainwater. If you’re building in a rainy or snowy climate, your dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less maintenance if you have a durable roof.

The drawings above show my recommended techniques using either wood poles or milled lumber. Wood poles are less expensive (or free), although they’re more tedious to work with. The basic ideas shown above can be altered to meet your needs. For instance, you could use purlins instead of roof sheathing. You could leave a gap between the roof and the dome for ventilation, add a skylight, gutters, etc.

Previous blog post on Roofed Domes

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Earthbag House Plans

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Roofed dome by Superadobe Construccion Blogspot (click to enlarge)

Roofed dome by Superadobe Construccion Blogspot (click to enlarge)


Kentucky Dome Home roofed dome.

Kentucky Dome Home roofed dome.


Rob Wainwright's roofed dome in Australia

Rob Wainwright's roofed dome in Australia


Dome with embedded rafters at Blog Daum.net

Dome with embedded rafters at Blog Daum.net

Earthen domes evolved in deserts. Due in part to the beautiful and interesting shape, people started building earthen domes in rainier climates. But domes are more vulnerable to moisture damage than roofed structures. Without a roof, domes are exposed to the rain and snow. Plaster will eventually crack and when it does moisture can cause serious damage. One option is to build roofed domes as shown in the photos above.

Image source: Superadobe Construccion Blogspot
Image source: Kentucky Dome Home
Image source: Rob Wainwright dome in Australia
Image source: Dome with embedded rafters at Blog Daum.net

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