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Posts Tagged ‘dome home’

This magnificent dome home in Baja Sur, Mexico has a dramatic view.

This magnificent dome home in Baja Sur, Mexico has a dramatic view.


Baja Sur dome home kitchen

Baja Sur dome home kitchen


Inspired by world-renowned American architect Nader Kahlili, these handmade art vaults [domes] are a typical example of the earth and ceramic architecture. Built with material free disposal of the land, the five domes technologies and innovations superadobe function currently available. Perched on a hill of El Gavilan – most dramatic settings in all of Great Northern Baja California Sur coast. Based on the designs of the environment, these vaults are among the Earth with solar energy and absolutely beautiful and out. Interiors feature soft curved walls, ceilings and many beautiful artistic touches. Each room has windows with views and doors opening onto a terrace overlooking the Pacific. Two comfortable rooms with beds and custom desktops, each with its own bathroom located on opposite wings of the main room. The buildings are energy efficient cool in summer and warm in winter, and probably the majority of households in the environment that never found. Two bedrooms with comfortable beds and desks custom, with STI Each bathroom situated on opposite wings off the main living area. Probably the most environmentally friendly homes you’ll ever come across.
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 2.0
Parking: 4
Land: 1499.92 m2
$499,000

Source: Casasy Terrenos.com

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Bonita Domes by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)

Bonita Domes by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)


Earthbag vaults by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)

Earthbag vaults by United Earth Builders (click to enlarge)


“I would like to announce the United Earth Builders 10 day intensive workshop beginning in April! Located in Joshua Tree we will be teaching attendees how to build a standard 8′ earthbag dome and a retaining wall.

Participants in this workshop will be led through a series of intellectual, cognitive, and physical exercises that seek to strengthen mind-body connections to both the technical processes, as well as the creative processes underlying the art and skill of earthbag design and construction. From structural principles and design, soil practicum and on-site planning this 10-day workshop will supply the attendee with full confidence in the building process and instill a renewed sense of community through building with the earth.

About
Our mission, duty and purpose is to provide educational and charitable services in regard to environmentally sustainable, affordable, and structurally sound sandbag homes with the intent to help relieve poverty by improving living conditions globally.

Mission
United Earth Builders mission, duty and purpose is to empower and instill confidence in people by providing educational and charitable services in regard to environmentally sustainable, artfully designed and truly organic homes that compliment Nature.

What guides us:
We seek to make a more positive world by turning up good music, playing with earth bag structures and teaching the techniques to anyone and everyone, smiling and laughing as we do it!

Rehabilitate ourselves through honest play and an ethical, moral and high spirited team of builders. The Golden Rule is our life and collaboration works for everyone.

What We Provide:
Experienced-based-learning – workshops that provide you will a wholesome curriculum and full hands-on building experience.
Collaborative community beautification projects; with local non-profits and community leaders; in order to provide a tool to combat community deterioration and help improve race and ethnic relations, lessening neighborhood tensions.
Fund raise in order to attain seismic shake table testing; a key factor for providing the public with a record of proof to show the International Code Council (ICC) that sandbag homes are a viable and safe option for global deployment.

Hands-on training
We provide local, national and global communities with the ability to design and build adequate housing using the most abundant resource on the planet.”

Source: United Earthbuilders on Facebook
United Earth Builders.com

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An earthbag dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less plaster maintenance if it’s protected by a durable roof. (click to enlarge)

An earthbag dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less plaster maintenance if it’s protected by a durable roof. (click to enlarge)


Attach rafters to braces that are embedded between courses of earthbags. (click to enlarge)

Attach rafters to braces that are embedded between courses of earthbags. (click to enlarge)


Nailers help hold braces in position. (click to enlarge)

Nailers help hold braces in position. (click to enlarge)


As discussed in a previous blog post the other day (see link below), dome roofs protect domes from moisture damage, shade the structure, reduce plaster work and capture rainwater. If you’re building in a rainy or snowy climate, your dome will likely have a longer lifespan and require less maintenance if you have a durable roof.

The drawings above show my recommended techniques using either wood poles or milled lumber. Wood poles are less expensive (or free), although they’re more tedious to work with. The basic ideas shown above can be altered to meet your needs. For instance, you could use purlins instead of roof sheathing. You could leave a gap between the roof and the dome for ventilation, add a skylight, gutters, etc.

Previous blog post on Roofed Domes

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“The small size (app. 600 sq. ft.) and super-efficient design fully lends itself to an inexpensive and minimal off grid solar wind inversion (4K or less) system, which could eliminate one fourth of our cumulative energy consumption if adopted by everyone. No one would need to be “ON THE GRID”…!”

Source: Elevated Earth Technologies

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Thea Bryant and her children will soon move into a permitted earthbag house they built in Austin, Texas.

Thea Bryant and her children will soon move into a permitted earthbag house they built in Austin, Texas.


Interior view of Thea’s earthbag dome home. Tours, workshops and work/trade arrangements available.

Interior view of Thea’s earthbag dome home. Tours, workshops and work/trade arrangements available.


“A series of domes constructed of earth, sand and water combine to make a home for Thea Bryant and her family. Dried mud is collected in buckets all around the structure and can be reconstituted by simply adding water. The structure was built using 40-year-old plans developed for the United Nations to build homes in developing nations. The technique uses a mixture of earth, sand and water stuffed into mesh tubes that are then coiled on each other in a circular pattern, creating dome. Small nooks jut out from the main dome and are meant to be used for sleeping and cooking stations. The project has taken nearly three years so far, but it’s near completion and Bryant has plans for a big party in celebration.”

Read the full article at Statesman.com
EarthbagHouse.com
Maybe some folks in that area would like to lend a hand. And maybe Thea is willing to share her plans and/or publish her floorplan?

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This is our LAST EARTHBAG HOME TOUR of the year Nov. 5 at 9:30-11:00am, 12711 Ventris Rd., Garfield, Arkansas! Come see our earthbag home, cordwood chicken house, learn tips on how to live a more sustainable life in these tough times! Topics: filling bags, materials, adobe walls, dehydrating foods, homemade toothpaste & deodorant, mosaics, permits, rock-laying, energy plans, & much more! $7/adults, kids under 12 FREE! email majorsway@ymail.com or call 479-409-9115

Tour Earthbag Dome Home, Organic Garden, & Cordwood Chicken House
Location: 12711 Ventris Road, Garfield, Arkansas
Dates: Sat. Nov 5, 2011
Time: 9:30am-11:00am
Cost: $7/adult, kids under 12 free!
Reserve your space! 479-409-9115 or majorsway@ymail.com
Website: MajorsWay.org

Paul and Lisa Majors earthbag dome home in Arkansas

Paul and Lisa Majors earthbag dome home in Arkansas

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Disaster Resistant Catenary Dome (click to enlarge)

Disaster Resistant Catenary Dome (click to enlarge)


Specifications: 314 sq. ft. interior, 181 sq. ft. interior loft, total = 495 sq. ft. interior, Footprint: 23’ diameter

This blog post is a continuation of the discussion about disaster resistant domes. So far we’ve talked about Hemispheric Domes and key ideas about How to Build the Strongest Buildings That Can Last Centuries.

Wiki describes a catenary arch as “the curve that an idealised hanging chain or cable assumes when supported at its ends and acted on only by its own weight.” A catenary arch can be inverted to define and guide the shape of a dome (a dome is an arch that’s been rotated about its axis). This creates an incredibly strong shape, that when combined with the right materials can produce structures with superior disaster resistance.

The idea for this design sprang from a reader who liked the disaster resistant building concept, but wanted a taller dome with a loft. Well, here it is.

More details at my Earthbag House Plans site.

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Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)


This 20′ interior diameter, 314 sq. ft. design is my proposed solution to Dustin’s dilemma in Florida for houses that can withstand repeat hurricanes. See How to Build the Strongest Buildings That Can Last Centuries for more details. Features include: lexan windows with removable window and door shutters, monolithic geopolymer slab floor that’s integrated with the walls, build on high ground, plastic mesh that won’t rust, geopolymer plaster both sides, geopolymer pumicecrete or geopolymer perlite fill. Integrating the slab and dome and building on a rubble trench is ideal for seismic zones. In an earthquake, the building would slide back and forth somewhat like an upside down cereal bowl on a kitchen table (meaning the whole house remains intact as one shell).

The design will have to be tweaked for individual homeowner needs, and some details worked out with the engineer. Note how a woodstove is shown to reach a wider audience, even though it’s probably not needed in Florida. The woodstove could be replaced with an emergency water storage and filtration system, etc. A fold-out bed saves space.

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)

Disaster-resistant hemispheric dome made with double ferrocement shells with insulating fill (click to enlarge)

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Earthquake and hurricane resistant geopolymer ferrocement cage filled with insulating material such as scoria or pumicecrete

Earthquake and hurricane resistant geopolymer ferrocement cage filled with insulating material such as scoria or pumicecrete


Dustin: I live in Florida where few domestic buildings last more than 50 years because of hurricanes. I explored the Monolithic Dome for quite some time. They have stood the test of direct hits by very powerful hurricanes that leveled the entire neighborhood; except the dome. The dome is the only sensible structure here. No other structural shape has ever withstood a Category 5+ Hurricane. EVER. Earthbag Domes seem capable of the same, or close. How can I finish an earthbag dome that won’t erode away in Florida storms?

Owen: A lot of people have been impacted by hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes. This is something I’ve been working on for years due to the seriousness of the problem. My article on Disaster Resistant Earthbag Housing provides some background information on this issue.

Kelly Hart, Patti Stouter and I collaborated on EarthbagStructures.com as an effort to consolidate information on disaster resistant earthbag structures, especially for developing regions.

The short answer to your question is to use either cement plaster, or preferably plaster the dome with Portland shotcrete or geopolymer shotcrete. Geopolymer is a natural material (essentially man-made stone) that’s stronger than Portland. The incredible benefits of geopolymer prompted me to start the Geopolymer House Blog, which already has over 140 blog posts.

Geopolymer is preferred because it’s stronger and more durable than Portland, although it’s not available everywhere yet and it’s probably more expensive. So fiber reinforced shotcrete would be the next best thing. I recommend ferrocement eyebrows over window and door openings to help keep out blowing rain. See Geopolymer Shotcrete on Reinforced Earthbags.

Another very similar option is to build a double shell ferrocement dome filled with lightweight insulation. Scoria or pumice would work perfectly for fill material in the core. As explained throughout our blogs many times (use the built-in search engine above to read the details), scoria and pumice are fireproof, rot proof, lightweight, insulating and do not attract insects or pests. Earthbags aren’t necessary. You could pump or pour scoria, pumice, perlite, pumicecrte or perlited cement from above directly into the core.

So far no one has built a dome like this as far as I know, even though this building system would create some of the strongest buildings in the world. I’m sure it would work. However, there’s a learning curve to everything and some details would need to be worked out. The end result would be just as strong if not stronger than monolithic concrete domes, and be more durable and more highly insulating. In addition, this design is almost certainly stronger than monolithic domes in seismic areas, because it would more readily flex under extreme loads.

Precision Structural Engineering, Inc. is the pioneer of Reinforced Earthbag Building and the only company at this time that engineers and stamps earthbag plans. They’re also expert in ferrocement and can engineer the ferrocement domes that I’m describing here. They have pre-approved my Earthbag House Plans and provide free quotes. They can get code approval in virtually every state as well as many countries.

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Milkwood Farm Earthbag Dome

Milkwood Farm Earthbag Dome


We are first generation farmers, establishing a small organic farm high in the hills near Mudgee, Australia. Our tools of choice are permaculture, regenerative agriculture, a heap of gumption and a dash of social enterprise. We also teach permaculture, go look at amazing stuff being done elsewhere, and push our two-year old on the swing under the loquat tree.

A couple of months ago we had the opportunity to build an earthbag dome at Milkwood Farm, and run a workshop while we built it. We jumped at the chance. We’d always wanted to try earthbag building, but where do you start with such a venture?

And so it was that over six days, Neil and Stella [of Guiding Star Creations] guided us and 20 other workshop participants through the dirty, intricate but surprisingly simple process of raising an earthbag dome from the soil of Milkwood. It was one hellava week.

Read the rest of the story at Milkwood Farm.

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