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Posts Tagged ‘grain bin’




It really helps to see finished examples of what others have done. Once again it’s YouTube to the rescue.

Cornell University’s Silo House
Glenburn Silo Home
Silo House aka The Cabin in the Woods (low quality footage but has some good points)

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Nice grain bin house (click to enlarge)

Nice grain bin house (click to enlarge)


Grain bin home

Grain bin home


Another grain bin house

Another grain bin house


Stuccoed grain bin home

Stuccoed grain bin home


Grain bin apartment

Grain bin apartment


Interior view of grain bin apartment (follow the link below to see more stunning pics)

Interior view of grain bin apartment (follow the link below to see more stunning pics)


Our recent blog posts about Sukup SafeT Homes and SafeT Home Videos proved popular, so I thought readers might enjoy seeing a few more grain bin homes.

Image source: Little Homestead in Boise
Image source: Mother Earth News
Image source: Greenieweenie
Image source: EcoFriend
Image source 5, 6: Travel Shack
Related:
Mother Earth News: Convert a Used Grain Bin to a New House (best article I’ve found so far on grain bin houses)

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Grain bin root cellar

Grain bin root cellar


“This is a root cellar we built out of an old grain bin that was going to be sold for scrap metal. When we had our CSA farm in Montana we needed a place to store vegetables to eat through the winter. We also wanted a place to keep the veggies cool while we prepared them for delivery in the summer season. We had so many rocks on our property that I was thinking about building a circular root cellar, using a rock wall that by design would keep the walls from caving in. That’s where the thought process started, circular things that would hold up to the pressures of dirt pushing against them. I was thinking about culverts at the time, and it led me to thinking about grain bins. Gigantic culverts! I’d always see what seemed to be abandoned grain bins in the fields along the highways and thought that maybe some farmer would be interested in selling one of them. So I checked into it. Low and behold, a farmer friend of ours knew somebody who tore down grain bins for scrap on the side, so I called him. He had two to choose from at the time, so I picked the 16 foot high by 18 foot diameter one. He said if I paid the $200 he would get for the scrap metal I could have it. SOLD!”

Read the entire article with step-by-step photos of construction at the source: Homestead Haven

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Sukup SafeT Home galvanized steel manufactured home

Sukup SafeT Home galvanized steel manufactured home


The most interesting thing about this product is it has already been designed and fabricated as a home. Some people have converted grain bins into homes by cutting door and window openings, etc. You can even buy plans for grain bin homes. But this is the first company to my knowledge that offers a complete home building kit that’s ready for assembly. This particular model sells for $5,700. It can be easily assembled with a few hand tools, although I would definitely use a cordless drill. And yes, it’s made with steel, an energy intensive material, but the extra environmental toll may be justified, for instance, where hurricanes and tornadoes routinely wreck havoc. Its virtually maintenance free 70-year life span is certainly a big plus. I’m impressed with the double, continuously vented roof that prevents overheating. So this design has some good features going for it. It would benefit from insulation. Some might find it practical as safe, temporary shelter while their permanent home is being built or as a cabin or storage building. I wonder if they sell the roof separately so it can be used on an earthbag roundouse?

Source: Sukup
Special thanks to Cliff for this tip.

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Grain Bins

Grain Bins


Grain Bin Roof on Hobbit House (click to enlarge)

Grain Bin Roof on Hobbit House (click to enlarge)


Another good roof option is a grain bin roof. Good quality grain bin roofs are typically maintenance free for decades, and a good choice for windy areas and hail zones. They are especially practical for those who live in agricultural areas and can buy the roofs separately from local grain bin suppliers. They’re also very practical for those short on time or where the building season is short. Order the size that will provide the appropriate roof overhang. Roof overhangs are important for protecting the walls and regulating solar gain. To install the roof, hoist the roof into place with a crane, bolt it down and you’re finished. Think of all the hours you’ll save on ladder work and climbing around on your hands and knees. Roofing is the most dangerous step of construction, so be careful out there.

Hobbit House Plan now available with three roof options
Photo credit: Hoosier Ag Today

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