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Posts Tagged ‘salvage’

Nice grain bin house (click to enlarge)

Nice grain bin house (click to enlarge)


Grain bin home

Grain bin home


Another grain bin house

Another grain bin house


Stuccoed grain bin home

Stuccoed grain bin home


Grain bin apartment

Grain bin apartment


Interior view of grain bin apartment (follow the link below to see more stunning pics)

Interior view of grain bin apartment (follow the link below to see more stunning pics)


Our recent blog posts about Sukup SafeT Homes and SafeT Home Videos proved popular, so I thought readers might enjoy seeing a few more grain bin homes.

Image source: Little Homestead in Boise
Image source: Mother Earth News
Image source: Greenieweenie
Image source: EcoFriend
Image source 5, 6: Travel Shack
Related:
Mother Earth News: Convert a Used Grain Bin to a New House (best article I’ve found so far on grain bin houses)

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Top view of double pallet wall with post and beam frame

Top view of double pallet wall with post and beam frame


Wooden shipping pallets are typically available for free and are very practical for building homes, furniture and many other things. We’ve already explored several ways of building pallet walls: Post and Beam Pallet Wall, Earth Lodge Pallet Walls, Interior Pallet Walls, Straw Bale Pallet Walls.

This new design sprang from the idea of creating wider pallet walls to provide space for extra straw/clay insulation or other type of insulation. Total wall thickness is about 16” not including plaster and/or wall cladding. Note how the good side (top side) of pallets all face outward. The building process is as follows:
1. Construct the post and beam frame. In this proposed design, the posts are spaced two pallets apart.
2. Build the interior pallet wall. Horizontal 2×4 or 2×6 plates are attached at the base, between courses of pallets and along the top. Plates could be 3’-4’ salvaged boards from broken pallets.
3. Add a spacer board between the pallet walls to help stabilize the wall. This could consist of short pieces of scrap blocking or a long board.
4. Build the exterior pallet wall so the outer surface aligns with the outside of the posts. Some partial pallets are required. Partial pallets could be cut from damaged pallets.
5. Mix and stuff straw/clay inside the pallet wall.

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House made from salvaged materials

House made from salvaged materials


“This article is a distillation of various tips and tricks I’ve learned for making salvaging and building an enjoyable and rewarding process. Building with salvaged materials has many potential advantages. First, salvaged materials are usually less costly than new materials, and they may be of better quality (e.g., well aged wood that doesn’t shrink, crack or twist). Salvaging is also a process that invites the serendipity of unexpected finds of special or beautiful things you couldn’t obtain or afford otherwise. For example, we ran across a solarium that we salvaged; we liked it so much that we redesigned our whole house around it.

As you begin salvaging materials, you develop a network of sources that you can use for later work; not only that, you meet many people in your area. And of course, you will feel all the satisfaction of recycling our earth’s resources instead of having them end up in the landfill. Finally, you can end up, after lots of work but moderate cash outlay, having a home you love without a huge monthly mortgage payment for years and years. This can be an excellent way to build, especially for the many people who don’t have a full-time job.”

Read the full article for free at the source: Permaculture Drylands Journal
More free articles from Permaculture Drylands Journal
Image source: Wiremash.com

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In this funny and insightful talk from TEDxHouston, builder Dan Phillips tours us through a dozen homes he’s built in Texas using recycled and reclaimed materials in wildly creative ways. Brilliant, low-tech design details will refresh your own creative drive.

Phoenix Commotion.com

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Tiny Texas Houses builds homes with 99% recycled materials

Tiny Texas Houses builds homes with 99% recycled materials


You can blow through a lot of money in a hurry at building supply centers. For many, buying all new materials isn’t practical. Instead of buying new, you could help demolish a building, trade work, etc. Let’s start a list of the easiest to find recycled building materials. Suggestions are welcome.

Lumber, doors, door hardware, sinks, bathtubs, tile, paint, wood stain, pallets, wire, assorted nails and screws, twine, scrap wood, scrap metal, buckets, cabinet hardware (knobs, pulls, drawer slides), glass bottles (bottle windows), plastic sheeting, tarps, poly or nylon straps (tie-downs), bricks

Tips:
– Look for higher quality faucets and windows (you might lose money on low quality windows due to heat loss)
– Avoid: particle board/pressed wood cabinets, sheeting and trim, plastic trim, vinyl wallpaper, treated/preserved wood, old carpet, foam padding, moldy materials
– Bigger cities/nicer neighborhoods have the best selection
– Network with building professionals to buy used materials direct
– Get to know people who own or work for demolition companies, scrap yards, construction companies, etc.

Image source: Tiny Texas Houses.com
(click to see some very interesting photos in their gallery)

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